Practising

A Mozart Fantasy, New Pieces and Voicing a Melody

In this month’s practice clinic, Graham Fitch answered questions on various topics in works by Mozart, Chopin and Tchaikovsky.

Resources for Improving Sight-reading

An overview of some of our resources for developing and improving your sight-reading skills.

Handel, Mendelssohn, Mozart and Rachmaninoff!

In this month’s practice clinic, Graham Fitch answered questions on trills, fingering, legato octaves and gave practising tips for tackling a difficult passage in works by Handel, Mozart, Mendelssohn and Rachmaninoff.

Notes or Rhythms – What’s More Important?

What’s more important, notes or rhythms? Sight-reading forces us to keep going no matter what happens which in turn has many benefits for our daily practice!

A Better Way to Play Faster

Pianists often find that a piece falls apart beyond a certain speed. This article offers a more effective method than using a metronome to play faster.

Finding and Choosing Piano Fingering

The only correct fingering is the one that works for your hand! This blog post provides some tips and suggestions for finding and choosing piano fingering.

Mozart, Mendelssohn, Grieg and Ravel!

In this month’s practice clinic Graham Fitch answered questions on coordinating the hands, using wrist rotation, trills and other topics in works by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Grieg and Ravel.

Beethoven, Chopin, Grieg & Debussy

This week’s blog post features our most recent Practice Clinic in which Graham Fitch responds to questions submitted by Online academy subscribers. In this recording, Graham discusses topics such as legato playing, fingering, building speed and quarantining in works by Beethoven, Chopin, Grieg and Debussy.

Piano Conversations with William Westney

William Westney and Graham Fitch discuss their experience with Dalcroze, desire to empower students, and the various ways they have found to achieve this.

It’s All in the Wrist

Our blog for this week features a guest post by renowned pedagogue, author and pianist William Westney. William is also our most recent addition to the Online Academy with his first contribution being a video lecture on re-thinking warming up. In this post, he shares a few thoughts arising from one of these videos. *** *** *** It’s a genuine honour and a thrill for me to join the stellar lineup of pianist and teachers here at the Online Academy. I had no trouble deciding on which topic might be first; the process of warming up body and mind together to create the conditions for a great practice – and how easily this can be done – has long been one of my favorite offerings to students. There’s one moment in video #1 that I’d like to comment on. While showing how beneficial it feels to us (as athletes) to stretch the joints well beyond the range of motion needed to play piano pieces, I refer to my wrists. At that point in the stretch they are sunk quite far down below the keyboard level (that’s the lovely therapeutic experience I like to call “wallowing”). I cheerfully interject, “Don’t worry – I would never play any actual piece of music from such a low position!” But I did wonder, while filming it, if some viewers might be appalled at what I was doing wrist-wise. Isn’t that position just plain wrong? Moments like this are so important, in a larger sense. We can hear about technique from experts – concepts that are true and good; but there’s a danger of our taking them too categorically, too much like holy writ, and this worries me a lot. […]

By |October 29th, 2020|Practising|0 Comments